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Tuesday, 03 January 2017 18:00

Fly Fishing Basics

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Fly fishing dates back hundreds of years, but it gained the most popularity in North America during the 19th and 20th centuries. From presidents to the common man, the challenge of fly fishing, including everything from the difficulty of casting to the diverse fishing conditions, appeals to all. If you are just starting out, here are the basics you need to know.

The Basic Materials

While many experienced fly fishermen have dozens of lures, lines and leaders, the beginner only needs the following:

  • Rod
  • Reel
  • Line
  • Leader and Tippet
  • Flies
  • Snips

 

Rod

Fly rods are different from other types of fishing rods. These rods bend in a specific way, allowing you to put the fly exactly where you want it. Finding the right rod consists of knowing (a) where you will be fishing and (b) what type of fish you will be catching. A 9-foot rod is the most common type among fly fishermen. Depending on the type of fish, you will use a specifically weighted rod. For example, a 3- and 4-weight rod would be used for smaller panfish, like bluegill and small trout.

Rod Weight Water Fish
1 - 2 Weight Extreme Light Freshwater Small Panfish
3 - 4 Weight Light Freshwater Small Panfish, Trout
5 Weight Freshwater Trout, Panfish, Small Bass
6 - 7 Weight Medium Freshwater/Light Saltwater Large Trout, Bass, Bonefish
6 - 7 Weight Medium Freshwater/Light Saltwater Large Trout, Bass, Bonefish
6 - 7 Weight Medium Freshwater/Light Saltwater Large Trout, Bass, Bonefish
8 - 9 Weight Heavy Freshwater/Saltwater Carp, Bass, Bonefish, Snook, Baby Tarpon
10 Weight Extreme Heavy Freshwater/ Medium Saltwater Tarpon, Salmon, Permit
11 - 12 Weight Heavy Saltwater Large Saltwater Species
11 - 12 Weight Heavy Saltwater Large Saltwater Species
13 - 15 Weight Extreme Heavy Saltwater Extreme big fish, tuna, sharks

 

Line

Fly rods and line are designed to work together, like a dynamic fishing duo. For instance, a 5-weight rod will work best with a 5-weight line. Most rods have the information printed on the shaft. As for color, some fly fishermen prefer a brightly colored line so they can see it easily in the water. Others prefer a color that blends into the background. Choose the color that works best for you.

Reel

A fly reel holds the line, and you operate it by stripping the line off of the reel and manipulating it with one hand and casting the rod with the other. Most fly reels have a disc-type drag system, although you can find some with a coiled spring mechanism, which automatically pulls the line into the reel.

Leader and Tippet

The leader and tippet are used to connect the fly to your colored line with a material that won’t scare the fish away. The leader also allows you to cast your line in a straight line. The leader is the clear material connected at the end of the fly line. The tippet is the lightweight material attached on the end of the leader and fly. Light and strong are two qualities of a great tippet. Tippets are used to help present the fly in the most realistic way.

Flies

There are three basic groups of flies, including streamers, nymphs and dry flies. The type of fly you use during your fishing trip depends on the flies or insects that are common in the area you are fishing. If you aren’t sure which flies to choose, check with the experts at your local bait shop.

Don’t forget a quality fly fishing vest for your first fly fishing trip! You can find one at a high quality retailer like Carhartt, along with other fishing gear essentials. Now go catch some fish!

Monday, 31 October 2016 19:00

Staff Field Trip

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                                                            Staff Field Trip     

So guess what the boys do when they get a day off in October.  You bet they go pheasant hunting!  Not a bad haul for a morning's work.  Matt Clawson our fishing outfitter lower right, Matt Ernst 2nd guide lower right and Shawn Smith our incredible chef standing.  Dietz, Red, Gus and Moose attending the after party.  Shawn served up some fresh pheasant parmesean with the most incredible red sausce ever.  Man o man what a feast.  

Oh yeah fishing.  Well the first part of October was okay, some really good days and some just satisfactory.  The truth is the 2nd half of October was a bit tough.  Lake turnover effect and some work on the dam really turnded the water off color and that combined with a lot of floating grasses due to vegiatation die off as the water cooled down was a tough combination for effective fishing. The Bighorn River is an incredible fishery and we tend to get spoiled if we aren't boating 20 fish or more or if the dry fly fishing isn't epic or if the Brown and Rainbows aren't 19" plus.  But that just reminds us of how great the river really is.  Still the best trout fishery in the lower 48 and has fished consistently extremely well all season.

Fall Fish

November will usher in the Brown spawn, the water will clear and the streamer fishing can be explosive as the Browns and Rainbows get aggressive with winter approaching.  It truly can be some of the best fishing of the year with hot fish and low crowds.  Thinnk about it!  For those of you coming back to the Bighorn River Lodge next year I have only one thing to say...BOOK EARLY....BOOK NOW.  This will ensure you get the dates and the guides you want.  Make plans and call Cheryl 406-666-2368.   See you on the river!

Rick 

Monday, 25 July 2016 19:00

EAT, SLEEP, FISH, PART II

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                                                                                   SLEEP

One of the major resons The Bighorn RIver Lodge is the best lodge on the river is the quality of its accommodations.  The main lodge has 5 well appointed rooms and we have a separate large cabin that can sleep up to 6 more guests. That gives us a capicity of 16 which is a perfect number of guest to keep the atmosphere friendly, social and not too large.

The main lodge has a spacious great room with a river rock fireplace, wet bar area, poker table and a beautiful deck that overlooks our 5 acre bass pond and the mountains beyond.  A gallery kitchen and adjoing dinning area are a focal point of the lodge.  Providing toal comfort and a feeling of "being at home" in the lodge is what we strive every day to provide for our guests.  

Four of the rooms in the lodge, two of which look out onto the bass pond, have twin beds which can be converted to a king bed should a guest request that.  The fifth room has two queen beds and a single twin as well.  The rooms are very comfortable and beautifully decorated with western art and furntiure some of which was made by the owner.  

A day at the lodge begins with breakfast usually at 7:30 after which clients will meet their guides and begin gearing up for a day on the river.  We are known for our boat lunches and those are served at mid day somewhere on the river.  About 5:00 pm guides and guest return to our private boat ramp.  We are the only lodge in the upper 13 miles of the river locted right on the river and with our own ramp.  A short walk up the driveway and everyone is back at the lodge.  No having to load up in vechiles and drive 10 miles or so to return to a lodge which all other fisherman must do.  

A shower, a change of clothes and our clients gather on the deck or in the greatroom for some refreshments followed by appetizers at 6:00 and dinner arond 7-7:30.  Perhaps a poker game after dinner or a cigar and cocktail on the deck and everyone is ready to turn in a get a wqelcome good nights sleep.  Tomorrow is another day and the fish are waiting.  Life is good. 

If you haven't ever been to the Bighorn River Lodge you are missing a fantastic experience.  Check out our Trip Advisor reviews and think about making plans to come for a visit.  You won't regret it.  Call Cheryl in the office at 406-666-2368 and make some plans.  

See you on the river! Rick

Wednesday, 20 July 2016 19:00

Dry Fly Action Picking Up

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The Bighorn River is in full summer swing and the dry fly action is heating up.  Anglers are finding decent hatches of PMD spinners in the morning, Yellow Sallies mid day and Black Caddis from about noon to dark.  There are even some Tricos showing up in the early hours.  Check out this phots of Gary with a beautiful 20" brown caught on a size 20 rusty spinner. Shawn McClure, his guide, put him on this bad boy and Gary made a perfect cast in some tough wind conditions.  Atta baby Gary!  This is a great time to visit us if you love fishing with dries.

The nymph program still remains strong.  The old reliable Wire Worm with a Soft Hackle Pink Sow Bug is still hard to beat, but Bighorn anglers are also doing well with Quill Nymphs, Caddis Pupa patterns, Split Case PMDs, Wonder Nymphs and olive Pheasant Tails.

If  you want to try something different, a Hopper witn a Black Ant dropper is always a hoot fished to the bank.  Those big splashy takes are always my favorite.  Any angler no matter what your skill level will have a good time right now at the Bighorn River Lodge so see if you can find a few days and start packing!  Remember EAT, SLEEP, FISH.

See you on the River!

Rick

 

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